NLI Signing: Two Written Questions Every D-1 Basketball Recruit Should Get Answered First

Today is the start of the NLI signing period. This is not a normal signing period in D-I basketball, because of the recent indictments of assistant coaches, agents, financial advisors, and Adidas marketers.

Things may be very different by the time you enroll next fall. Many more indictments may issue. Many coaches may resign or be fired. Many new ‘scandals’ may be exposed, at many other schools. The men indicted so far know alot, and are talking to the feds. The school, program, coach, or team you think you are signing up with may be very different next fall, and you may be looking to get released from the NLI you sign this November.

Two Questions for Each Coach, in Writing

Before you sign the NLI, insist that any coach who recruits you, including assistants or head coaches (each of them), respond to these two questions, in writing (by email):

ONE: are you aware of any significant violations of NCAA legislation involving your basketball program? If so, list them.

TWO: Have you reported through the appropriate individuals on your campus to your chancellor/president any knowledge of violations of NCAA legislation involving your institution?

[The second question is lifted from Form 17-2, shown below, which all D-II and DIII coaches have to sign every year, and which D-I coaches had to sign — until the requirement was removed on 8/1/17.]

20171108_081147.jpg

You deserve to know these things, in writing, before you sign. (If a coach will not answer these questions, that is a red flag that you should not commit to the school.) And if things later blow up at the school, based upon some NCAA violations which the coach knew about and failed to disclose in his answers, you have a much stronger case for being released from the NLI.

Big-time college basketball may be in the process of blowing itself up. Protect yourself with these two simple written questions.

 

 

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About brewonsouthu

Michigan and Big Ten fan, former lawyer, with interest in college sports and NCAA oversight and decisions, and sports generally.
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